Our blog includes posts about a wide range of estate planning topics, including trust-based estate plans, estate planning when you have a disabled adult child, planning as part of a blended family, and planning for charitable giving. To learn more, contact our office to discuss how we can help you create an estate plan that best fits your needs.

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  • Do Your Estate Planning So Grieving Relatives Don't Have That Burden Only 35 percent of Americans have a will, according to a 2012 survey by FindLaw.com, a legal information Web site. If you die intestate, which is what dying without a valid will is called, your assets could be distributed according to the laws of your state or as the result...
  • Will Your Loved Ones Know What to Do When You Are Gone? If you’ve named your children, relatives or friends to be in charge as “Successor Trustee” of your Living Trust when you pass away, they probably have no idea of what to do! After all, they’ve probably never served as a Trustee before! Unfortunately… What your Successor Trustee doesn’t know could...
  • That's it ...You're Out of the Will! For testators who have been actively involved in the dynamics of their own family for decades, disinheritance might be an easy decision. For estate planners, however, disinheritance is a difficult issue to deal with that must be addressed adequately or can leave an estate plan open to challenge after the...
  • Get Your Head Out of the Sand! When Rocket Lawyer asked why so many people do not have wills, here’s what they said: 57% said they “just haven’t gotten around to making one” 22% felt that making a will wasn’t urgent 17% didn’t think they needed a will 14% don’t have a will because they don’t want...
  • And Baby Makes ... What? An Insurance Addition As you pick out the crib, stroller and tiny clothes, don't forget about health insurance for Junior. Make sure you sign up your infant for coverage within 30 days of birth. A federal rule requires insurance providers to cover children signed up within 30 days of birth retroactively to day...
  • What Is One of the Most Common Mistakes in Estate Planning? You may have made a giant estate planning mistake without even knowing it — forgetting to update the names of your beneficiaries for your employer-sponsored retirement plans, IRAs, life insurance policies, mutual funds, bank accounts, brokerage accounts, annuities, and 529 college savings plans. The article titled "Don’t make the No....
  • It's That Time of Year ... Graduation! Prepaid college tuition plans are no longer the surefire solution to runaway tuition costs they once seemed. The mostly state-sponsored plans were designed as a way to save for college by locking in at least a portion of future tuition at today's prices. Spring time means graduation. Graduation may mean...
  • Come on, Estate Planning Has to Hurt a Little? Nobody wants to contemplate his or her own mortality. And you may even feel that, in the context of death, questions about who gets which of your assets seem trivial. That might explain why numerous recent studies have found that only between 35% and 45% of Americans have a will...
  • Are You Planning to Live to Be 100? A new academic study suggests taking life expectancy into account when estate planning. In the paper, three economists from the Center for Retirement Research (CRR) at Boston College found that folks who expect to live longer plan, on average, to work longer too. And if a health shock or the...
  • Mom Liked Me Best! “The more that there is an economic gulf between siblings, the less they see each other and talk,” says Dalton Conley, professor at New York University and author of “The Pecking Order: Which Siblings Succeed and Why.” The reason, he says, is that from the perspective of the less wealthy...
  • Did You Make Your Fortune the "Old-Fashioned Way?" One of the greatest tricks up the proverbial sleeves of rich families wanting to preserve generational wealth is their ability to pass along their assets to their heirs in perpetuity. They’re able to do this free from the grip of creditors, the IRS, state and local tax authorities, litigators, ex-spouses,...
  • Affordable Retirement Locales Try to purchase a home in New York City with a budget of $140,000 and the options are pretty limited–a 375-square-foot apartment in Queens may be the most luxurious possibility. In Los Angeles, buyers may have to look exclusively at inland foreclosures. But in Knoxville, Tennessee, $140,000 buys a 1,750-square-foot,...